Kakka Muttai - Lessons in Film Making and Life at Large

Updated: May 23

Head over to the Podcast by clicking on bit.ly/371UhRA if you want to listen to this review. Else, have a happy read.


My prayer to God after watching the movie – it’s okay if you give me the sight of a slum, but please gimme the vision to see a Disneyland there.


The basic plot - Two slum kids want to earn INR 300 to savour a pizza from the shop that has been built over a place where they used to enjoy eating crow eggs.



I always thought that a fairytale movie couldn't be made without a beautiful lead cast, picturesque locations, romantic music and massive budgets. But the director, Mr. Manikandan - literally opened my eyes to a new reality of story telling. The lead characters were 2 small unknown kids, there are many ultra close up shots of the slum drains, minimal background score & songs, and finally, it would’ve costed lesser than the remuneration of a star actor. In my opinion, a fairytale was woven with the extremes of all the elements. In fact, I began wondering if this fairytale was more beautiful than the one I had visualised.


The director deals with the innocence, stubbornness, and excitement that is natural to every child in such a mature manner. There is one particular scene in which the kids decide to steal a phone from a passenger's hand sitting at the door of a moving train. Now, the plot demands them to get money to solve the overarching conflict. They plan it but the elder one gives up the idea at the end when it was at his arms reach.Instead they do a whole lot of menial jobs to earn the same amount of money. The stealing would’ve given that sum of money in a single shot. This one scene was enough for me to salute the depth of understanding the director had with respect to his characters, young or aged.


All the scenes are steeped in complete authenticity to the plot and are organic. The sub plots don’t seem rushed and the inter linking doesn’t feel forced either. 

Humble and grounded performances by the entire cast makes it a treat to watch. I don’t want to reveal much of the story, as the beauty of this fairytale is directly proportional to the empathy generated with each character. This in turn is a result of unique, yet possible situations that arise from the sheer brilliance of scene design. 


Overall, I would say that this fairytale is worth narrating to a world that has drowned itself in its own expectations of success and happiness. I sincerely pray that we all understand the essence of the movie by watching it and understanding the lyrics of the final song. 


All I can say is that you are up for a pizza treat. 

P.S. The movie is available on Hotstar 

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